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Vol. 20. Issue 1.
Pages 103-104 (January - February 2016)
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Vol. 20. Issue 1.
Pages 103-104 (January - February 2016)
Clinical image
DOI: 10.1016/j.bjid.2015.08.015
Open Access
Oral paracoccidiodomycosis mimicking lip carcinoma
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Fábio Muradás Girardia,
Corresponding author
fabiomgirardi@gmail.com

Corresponding author at: Head and Neck Department, Hospital Ana Nery, Pereira da Cunha Street, 209, CEP: 96835-090, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS, Brazil.
, Maria Lúcia Scroferneckerb
a Head and Neck Surgery Department, Hospital Ana Nery, Santa Cruz do Sul, RS, Brazil
b Microbiology Department, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
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A 65-year-old man, actively engaged in farming activities, with a 90 pack-year smoking history, presented with a painless ulcerated lesion on the left labial commissure. He was referred to our department because of suspected neoplasia. The lesion progressed slowly through a 2-year period. Oral examination revealed an extensive ulcer, although flat and with no signs of orbicularis oris muscle infiltration (Fig. 1), involvement of mandibular division of facial nerve, or suspicious neck lymph nodes metastasis. A representative incisional biopsy was performed. Histopathological examination exhibited chronic granulomatous inflammation on conventional hematoxylin–eosin staining. Grocott-Gomori staining showed fungal structures. Clinical and pathological evidences supported the diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). Itraconazole was maintained for six months with satisfactory response to proposed therapy.

Fig. 1.

Clinical examination. An extensive ulcer on the left lip commissure.

(0.3MB).

PCM is a systemic mycosis characterized by acute or chronic tissue inflammation caused by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus that is endemic to Latin America.1 Active agricultural laborers, masons and civil construction workers, or those who have a history of agricultural labor are at greater risk for PCM.1 Men are nine times more likely to be diagnosed than women.1 The cutaneous and mucosal lesions result from hematogenous dissemination, either by contiguity or rarely by direct inoculation under the tissue. Signs and symptoms are related to the affected site, and usually appear as visible lesions or non-specific symptoms.1 In cases of mucocutaneous disease, the oral and nasal cavities are the most commonly affected sites.2

Similarly to PCM, head and neck carcinomas usually present with exophytic, infiltrative or ulcerative lesions, affecting middle-aged and elderly white men, mostly those with smoking and/or drinking habits.3 As risk factors and clinical manifestations are similar to those of head and neck carcinomas, a differential diagnosis is necessary.

Author contributions

Fábio Muradás Girardi contributed to conception, design, acquisition of data, analysis and interpretation of data; drafted the article and revised it critically for important intellectual content; gave final approval of the version to be published; and agreed to act as guarantor of the work (ensuring that questions related to any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved).

Maria Lúcia Scroferneker contributed to conception, design, and interpretation of data; drafted the article and revised it critically for important intellectual content; gave final approval of the version to be published; and agreed to act as guarantor of the work (ensuring that questions related to any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved).

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgment

The author would like to thank Dr Bruno Schinke for his assistance with pathological examination.

References
[1]
F.X. Palheta-Neto, J.S. Moreira, A.C.C. Martins, F.J. Cruz, E.R. Gomes, A.C. Pezzin-Palheta.
A study of 26 cases of Paracoccidioidomycosis evaluated at the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (FIOCRUZ).
Rev Bras Otorrinolaringol, 69 (2003), pp. 622-627
[2]
J.C. Bisinelli, F.Q. Telles, J.A. Sobrinho, A. Rapoport.
Stomatological manifestations of paracoccidioidomycosis.
Rev Bras Otorrinolaringol, 67 (2001), pp. 683-687
[3]
F.M. Girardi, M.L. Scroferneker, V. Gava, R. Pruinelli.
Head and neck manifestations of paracoccidiodomycosis: an epidemiological study of 36 cases in Brazil.
Mycopathologia, 173 (2012), pp. 139-144
Copyright © 2015. Elsevier Editora Ltda.. All rights reserved
The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases

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