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Vol. 17. Issue 6.
Pages 712-713 (November - December 2013)
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Vol. 17. Issue 6.
Pages 712-713 (November - December 2013)
Clinical image
DOI: 10.1016/j.bjid.2013.04.013
Open Access
Purpura fulminans: an unusual complication of malaria
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Alka Sharmaa, Vishal Sharmab,
Corresponding author
docvishalsharma@gmail.com

Corresponding author at: 1819 Gobind Nagar, Chheharta, Amritsar, Punjab, India.
a Department of Medicine, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh, India
b Department of Gastroenterology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
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A 45-year-old male presented with history of fever for four days and a skin rash for two days. The rash was present primarily at the extremities and had progressed to acquire a blackish hue at the time of presentation (Figs. 1 and 2). The patient was febrile and had hepatosplenomegaly. On further workup, the patient was diagnosed to have Plasmodium falciparum malaria on peripheral smear and antigen testing. The fever responded to intravenous artesunate and oral doxycycline. The patient lost his second and fourth toes of the right lower limb.

Fig. 1.

Purpuric rash on hands.

(0.13MB).
Fig. 2.

Skin rash and gangrenous changes in lower limb.

(0.09MB).

Purpura fulminans is a cutaneous manifestation of disseminated intravascular coagulation.1 It most commonly is a result of sepsis related to meningococcal, streptococcal or other bacterial infection. On occasion, it has been reported with malaria or deficiencies of anticoagulants like protein C or S. The management includes treatment of underlying disease and the use of activated protein C.1,2 Cutaneous manifestations are unusual with malaria and purpura fulminans has been reported only occasionally with malaria.3,4

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References
[1]
M.P. Agarwal, V. Sharma.
Clinical images: purpura fulminans caused by meningococcemia.
[2]
N. Bhardwaj, S. Aggarwal, A. Sharma, V. Sharma.
Photoclinic. Streptococcal purpura fulminans.
Arch Iran Med, 15 (2012), pp. 115-116
[3]
V. Sharma, M. Singhal, A. Sharma, V. Kumar.
Febrile urticaria in a family: uncommon manifestation of a common disease.
J Infect Dev Ctries, 6 (2012), pp. 895-896
[4]
A. Khaira, V. Gupta, A. Gupta, S. Mahajan, D. Bhowmik, S.C. Tiwari.
Rare presentation of a common disease of tropics.
J Assoc Physicians India, 56 (2008), pp. 721-723
Copyright © 2013. Elsevier Editora Ltda.. All rights reserved
The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases

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